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© 2019 by Savannah J. Goins all rights reserved 

The Loch Ness Monster: Fierce or Fictitious?

June 20, 2018

I couldn’t very well end a cryptozoology series without including a post on the famous Loch Ness Monster, now could I?

 

This creature hardly needs an introduction. Perhaps one of the most well-known examples of cryptozoology, it’s popularity may only be rivaled with that of Bigfoot, the subject of my last post.

 

Are you a believer?

 

Reportedly, the first recorded sighting of the beast was in 565 AD, when St. Columba forced it back into the ocean after it ate a farmer.

 

The next recorded sighting wasn’t until 1933, during extensive road construction near the Loch. It is believed that the noise and vibrations from the machinery may have awoken the beast and caused it to investigate.

 

After that, there were several reported sightings of a mysterious creature in area, and it was just a year later that the famous photo of what looks like a slim head and neck of a prehistoric animal was taken by a surgeon from London, Dr. R. K. Wilson.

Did you know there was a Loch Ness Investigation Bureau? Sounds pretty official. The organization was started in 1962 and performed a ten year study on the area, going so far as to send sonar and underwater photography equipment into the depths. The most they turned up was one possibly promising picture of a large flipper.

This was later shown to be likely something else that only resembled a flipper: a piece of plastic waste with a few folds in it. 

Interestingly, a new team of scientists are conducting a search of the DNA within Loch Ness, using a method that has been used to track the presence of invasive fish in the Great Lakes and an invasive frog species in France. They will publish their results in January 2019.

 

What does this mean? Well, if there is a Loch Ness Monster, it will have DNA. Skin cells, mucous. Even if it is scaly, and even should it not shed it’s scales, there will be tissue cells released into the environment with its excrement.

 

What would its DNA look like? Well, maybe like something we would expect, some DNA sample of prehistoric beasts we’ve collected. Or maybe it would be something we’ve yet to ever collect before, but similar to a lizard or a whale or some other kind of animal with which the monster may share common traits.

 

People have used sonar imaging and drones and all kinds of things over the years with inconclusive evidence. Will this be the one test that finally turns up something promising?

 

Even if it doesn’t turn up anything, it is still possible that something is out there that couldn’t be found. What if they don’t find any mysterious DNA? There is a lot of water in the area, it could be easy to miss something so small. On the other hand, if this creature has lived there so long and is so big, it should have a decent stock of DNA floating around in there.

 

I can’t wait to see what they find out!

In Recent Media

 

There are about a million and ten movies about the Loch Ness Monster, but my favorite—at least of the ones I’ve seen—is The Water Horse. I was so jealous of the protagonist! It’s been years since I’ve seen it, but from what I remember, it’s a fantastic movie.

 

Back to childhood again, there was this show called Happy Ness, full of animated, sentient, friendly Loch Ness Monsters. That was something else I really enjoyed as a kid.

 

What about you? What’s the best movie/show you’ve seen featuring our old friend? Feel free to share in the comments!

Creative Corner

 

I'm all about monsters that end up befriending the protagonist. Things like dragons that end up being good friends and fellow fighters instead of just ravenous beasts to run away from. So what if there was a Nessie who befriended a human? That's totally been done before, but what kind of twist could you put on it to make it unique and new?

 

Good luck!

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